Webcast

Immigration in 2021: Anticipating Changes under a New Administration

Streams live on Thursday, January 21, 2021 at 11:30am EST

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Course Information

Time 60 Minutes
Difficulty Intermediate

Course Description

The Trump administration oversaw over 400 actions on immigration, during which time net migration to the United States fell in half. Massive changes were implemented related to restrictions on the abilities of refugees and others seeking protection from harm; the (attempted) termination of DACA and Temporary Protected Status; human rights concerns at detention facilities and lack of protections for children and families; expansions of interior and border enforcement without due process; human rights concerns at detention facilities and lack of protections for children and families; bans on the issuance of many types of visas, the suspension of visa interviews, and numerous travel bans coving much of the world; curtailments of the ability to study and work temporarily in the U.S.; changes to burden of proof for USCIS and court filings; increased burdens and sanctions on employers; reshaping of the courts and USCIS to adopt a much more enforcement-oriented approach; and many more. 

The incoming Biden administration promises to roll back many of these changes and to implement entirely new policies, but what exactly will these entail? What will differ for refugees, asylum-seekers, dreamers, international students, foreign employees and U.S. employers, those immigrating through family relationships, and others? What would a comprehensive immigration reform proposal look like? How would enforcement agencies be directed to change their policies and what oversight would be provided for those in detention? 

This course, presented by immigration attorneys Matt Blaisdell, Amy Peck, and Ruby Powers, will provide assistance to attorneys representing or advising immigrants in all contexts.



Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify which changes are likely to remain and which will be immediately reversed
  2. Examine new and upcoming developments within the immigration courts, humanitarian visas, and asylum
  3. Explore possible changes with employment-based and investor-based visas
  4. Review changes to family-based immigration, waivers, and TPS
  5. Anticipate new processes and procedures to be implemented at consular posts abroad
  6. Discuss whether and how enforcement policies will revert to prior practices or develop into new procedures

Credit Information

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Faculty

Ruby Powers

Powers Law Group, P.C.

Ruby L. Powers is the founder and managing attorney of Powers Law Group, P.C., a full-service immigration law firm based in Houston, Texas. Powers is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin and the University of North Carolina School of Law. She is Board Certified in Immigration and Nationality Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. She is an alumna of Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses, Leadership Houston, and a fellow of the American Leadership Forum.

Powers started her law firm from her house in the height of the Great Recession in 2009 and have since grown her business up to 14 employees, including multiple attorneys and satellite offices. She once managed her firm remotely from Dubai and Turkey for 14 months.

Powers manages to run a successful law practice in a challenging area of law while balancing community involvement and pro bono legal representation. She is a frequent national and international speaker, author, and media resource on the topics of immigration law and policy and law practice management. Her expertise and advocacy efforts have been featured in the Washington Post, CNN, NPR, the New York Times, BBC World News, and beyond. Powers’ experience in legislative work in Washington, D.C., and the Texas State Capitol prompted her to pursue public office. Powers is currently running for a position in the Texas State Legislature. Ruby serves as AILA Media Advocacy Committee Vice-Chair, was AILA Texas Chapter Advocacy Chair 2014-2019, Powers was awarded the AILA Advocacy Award, Houston Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 Award, Houstonia Magazine Top Lawyer, After years of advocacy at the border, the state capital, and in her community, Ruby decided to run for public office and continues to advocate for her community.

Powers lives in Houston with her husband, Burak, and her two children, Rex and Violet. She enjoys traveling, reading (mostly business books), and playing sports and board games with her family.

For updates to the book and other tips: http://BuildandManageYourSuccessfulImmigrationLawPractice.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/YourSuccessfulLawPractice

The Author’s Law Firm: www.RubyPowersLaw.com


Matthew Blaisdell

Matthew Blaisdell, Esq.

Matthew Blaisdell is an attorney in Brooklyn, New York, with a full concentration in immigration law. He is the former Chair of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) National Consumer Protection and Unauthorized Practice of Law Committee and is current Chair of AILA’s Consumer Protection Rapid Response Team. He frequently writes and presents on the topic of consumer protection and immigration fraud, and he has provided testimony to several cities considering legislation to protect immigrant consumers.

He also regularly provides trainings and lectures on topics related to attorney ethics, practice management, prosecutorial discretion and advocating before various government agencies, immigration legislation and policies, constitutional issues, immigration options for youth and unaccompanied minors, LGBTQ immigration issues, immigration consequences of criminal activity, humanitarian forms of relief, and non-immigrant visas.

He received his juris doctor, as well as an LL.M in environmental law, from Pace Law School, and is a graduate of the New York City Environmental Law Leadership Institute (NYCELLI).



Amy L. Peck

Jackson Lewis P.C.

Amy L. Peck is a Principal in the Omaha, Nebraska, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. She dedicates her practice exclusively to immigration law and worksite compliance, and she is Co-Leader of the firm's Immigration practice group.

Ms. Peck is one of 21 Directors elected to serve on the 14,000-member American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) Board of Governors. She currently is serving on the Board of Trustees of the American Immigration Council.

Ms. Peck is a member of the AILA National Verification Committee, which liaises with USCIS, ICE and OCAHO on I-9, E-verify and related worksite issues. Ms. Peck recently served on the AILA National USCIS Benefits Committee, the Interagency Committee, the Annual Conference Committee, previously chaired the AILA FOIA Liaison Committee, the AILA Comprehensive Reform Committee (2010-2011) and is a founding member of the Global Migration Action Group (2009 to present). She served as Chair of the AILA National Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) liaison committee (2008-2010). Ms. Peck also served as Chair of the Strategic Planning Committee for AILA (2008-2009) and served on the Spring Conference committee (2008-2010). She was chosen as the editor of the AILA Midyear Conference materials in 2010, and past Chair of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) liaison committee (2004-2006). She is past Chair of the AILA Iowa-Nebraska chapter (2001-2003), and previously served as its treasurer (1999-2000).

Ms. Peck is a frequent speaker on worksite enforcement issues, and has recently been quoted in the The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal on employment and enforcement immigration issues.