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Advanced Legal Issues Under NYS & NYC Human Rights Law

53m

Created on September 17, 2020

Advanced

$89

Overview

In 1945, two decades before Congress adopted the 1964 Civil Rights Act, New York State adopted the first state anti-discrimination law in America. In 1975, New York City adopted its own anti-discrimination law, now widely regarded as the broadest anti-discrimination statute in the United States.

With recent notable events and headlines, from the explosive allegations against Harvey Weinstein and others to the murder of George Floyd, the New York State Legislature and New York City Council have made these already robust civil rights laws more powerful tools to combat discrimination, abuse, and unlawful conduct.    

In this program, Robinson + Cole labor, employment law, and civil rights partner Matthew Miklave provides a comprehensive update on these two statutes, exploring their expanded reach, new training, and compliance obligations, and expanded remedies. Mr. Miklave will also discuss the interplay between the State and City Human Rights Law (HRL) and other recent legislative enactments intended to further the government’s efforts to combat workplace and other unlawful discrimination. 

After watching this program, attorneys will be better prepared to counsel their clients on the implications of these laws for workers, interns, applicants, and employers living, working, and doing business in New York State and New York City.

Note:  This advanced course builds on the intermediate courses, “An Overview of the New York State and City Human Rights Law (An Update)” (February 9, 2018) and “The State of the New York State and City Human Rights Laws” (November 4, 2019).


 
Learning Objectives:

  1. Summarize recent legislation expanding the reach of the HRLs
  2. Address the impact of legislative changes on internal policies and procedures
  3. Discuss federal and state court decisions applying the revisions 

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