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Hot Topics in Sports Law: What to Expect in 2020

(148 reviews)

Produced on February 04, 2020

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Course Information

Time 63 minutes
Difficulty Intermediate

Course Description

The legal and business landscape for professional and amateur sports continues to experience rapid change. The last year was a dynamic one, involving a myriad of legal issues that may lead to a significant alteration in the collegiate model and more incremental changes in professional sports. Taught by sports law professor Mark Conrad, this 60-minute course will discuss the major sports law issues for the coming year that may lead to critical changes in the field. Highlights include California’s law allowing student athletes to monetize their names, likenesses, and images, and the NCAA’s response to that law. Other topics will include the increasing number of states legalizing sports betting and the ramifications for leagues and athletes, the rising labor tensions between the Major League Baseball and its Players Association and similarly, between the NFL and its players. In the area of Olympic sports, the seminar will discuss the continuing ramifications of the sexual abuse scandals and the latest litigation. Also covered will be updates on concussion litigation, and challenges to “jock taxes” aimed at athletes.



Learning Objectives:
  1. Discuss the ramifications of California’s “Pay to Play” law and potential constitutional challenges to that law
  2. Analyze whether the NCAA will implement its new policy allowing student athletes to monetize their names and images
  3. Review updates to the ongoing the antitrust challenge to limitations on student athlete compensation
  4. Predict the prospects for labor unrest in professional sports
  5. Interpret the latest rulings involving athlete injuries due to concussions
  6. Gauge the reforms coming from cases of sexual and emotional abuse of athletes and the responsibility of governing bodies 

Credit Information

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Faculty

Mark Conrad

Fordham University Gabelli School of Business

Mark Conrad is an Associate Professor of Law and Ethics at Fordham University’s Gabelli School of Business, where he directs its sports business concentration. In addition to teaching sports law, he has also taught courses covering contracts, business organizations, and media law.

Professor Conrad’s books and articles have appeared in academic, legal and general circulation publications. His book “The Business of Sports -- Off the Field, In the Office, On the News,” (Routledge/Taylor and Francis, has been cited in leading journals as one of the most comprehensive texts on the subject. The third edition will be released in the spring of 2017. He has also published in academic and non-academic journals on various sports law topics, including governance issues, intellectual property, collegiate, and international issues. In addition to his full-time responsibilities at Fordham, Professor Conrad has served as an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s Sports Management Program and at St. John’s University’s LL.M in International Sports Practice. He served as president of the Sport and Recreation Law Association from 2014-15 and now is president of the Alliance for Sport Business. Professor Conrad has been quoted in the New York Times, Boston Globe, and Chicago Tribune and has appeared on CNN and Bloomberg TV.

Professor Conrad received his B.A. from City College of New York and his J.D. from New York Law School. He also received an M.S. from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. He is a member of the New York and District of Columbia bars and resides in New York City.

You may follow him on Twitter at @Sportslaw1.



Reviews

JM
Joseph M.

Very interesting subject matter

CS
Christopher S.

Interesting topic.

FB
Frank B.

Good course with a bunch of things going on (although he did punt on my question :)

TS
Thomas S.

Great presentation, tons of topics covered in sports law. Could have taken an all day one on these topics

MS
Michael S.

Great info condensed into an hour long CLE

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